__Even with equal parts Campari, gin, and sweet vermouth, the bitterness of a Negroni firmly establishes the drink as a Campari-based cocktail. No one is undecided about a Negroni. This Italian big brother to the Americano and distant cousin to the martini is so bitter that its dissenters swear it should be stored in the medicine chest. Its fanatical adherents bask in its ruddy glow and tongue-tingling taste. Some contend that this classic cocktail dates back to Florence in the 1920s, when the flamboyant count—and noted tippler—Camillo Negroni asked for a splash of gin added to his Americano. Others say that the drink, mixed with vodka or gin, has been around as long as the Americano. The Campari company, itself unsure of the origin, eventually decided that the drink should be called a Negroni to avoid confusion with all the other Campari cocktails.

For a longer drink, serve a Negroni with a splash of soda. The cocktail may also be shaken and poured straight up in a cocktail glass.
_
INGREDIENTS:
1 ounce gin
1 ounce sweet vermouth
1 ounce Campari
Slice of orange

INSTRUCTIONS:
  1. In a mixing glass, pour the gin, Campari and vermouth.
  2. Add ice. Stir along the outter edge 7 times, then strain into a cocktail glass.
  3. Express the orange peel over the glass and drop it in.
 
 
 
 
That got out of hand very quickly...
 
 
 
 
 
 
_Chinese New Year is the most important of the traditional Chinese holidays. In China, it is known as "Spring Festival," the literal translation of the Chinese name 春節, since the spring season in Chinese calendar starts with lichun, the first solar term in a Chinese calendar year. It marks the end of the winter season, analogous to the Western carnival. The festival begins on the first day of the first month (Chinese: 正月) in the traditional Chinese calendar and ends with Lantern Festival which is on the 15th day. Chinese New Year's Eve, a day where Chinese families gather for their annual reunion dinner, is known as Chúxī (除夕) or "Eve of the Passing Year." Because the Chinese calendar is lunisolar, the Chinese New Year is often referred to as the "Lunar New Year".

Chinese New Year is the longest and most important festivity in the Chinese calendar. The origin of Chinese New Year is itself centuries old and gains significance because of several myths and traditions. Chinese New Year is celebrated in countries and territories with significant Chinese populations, such as Mainland China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Macau, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, and also in Chinatowns elsewhere. Chinese New Year is considered a major holiday for the Chinese and has had influence on the lunar new year celebrations of its geographic neighbors. These include Korean (Seollal), Bhutanese (Losar), and Vietnamese cultures.

Within China, regional customs and traditions concerning the celebration of the Chinese new year vary widely. People will pour out their money to buy presents, decoration, material, food, and clothing. It is also the tradition that every family thoroughly cleans the house to sweep away any ill-fortune in hopes to make way for good incoming luck. Windows and doors will be decorated with red colour paper-cuts and couplets with popular themes of "good fortune" or "happiness", "wealth", and "longevity". On the Eve of Chinese New Year, supper is a feast with families. Food will include such items as pigs, ducks, chicken and sweet delicacies. The family will end the night with firecrackers. Early the next morning, children will greet their parents by wishing them a healthy and happy new year, and receive money in red paper envelopes. The Chinese New Year tradition is to reconcile, forget all grudges and sincerely wish peace and happiness for everyone.

Although the Chinese calendar traditionally does not use continuously numbered years, outside China its years are often numbered from the reign of the Yellow Emperor. But at least three different years numbered 1 are now used by various scholars, making the year beginning in AD 2012 the "Chinese Year" 4710, 4709, or 4649.

I stole most of this from wikipedia...stop SOPA and PIPA!
Year of the Dragon

Fifth in the cycle, Dragon Years follow the Rabbit and recur every twelfth year. The Chinese New Year does not fall on a specific date, so it is essential to check the calendar to find the exact date on which each Dragon Year actually begins

The Year of the Dragon is one of the most revered years of the Chinese New Year calendar, and those born under the sign are regarded as innovative, passionate people who are colorful, confident and fearless.

The  Dragon is sometimes called a "karmic sign." The Dragon is larger than life and its appearance means that big things are to come. The Year of the Dragon is a flowing river, not a stagnant lake, so things happen quickly earlier in the year. The Dragon marks progression, perseverance and auspiciousness. It may also bring about unpredictable events.
More importantly, 恭喜發財, 新年快樂, 年年有餘,
身体健康, 龙马精神, 生意兴隆.

Happy New Year!

 
 
When i was in Mexico, we came across something that changed my bbq life. While out and about, we came across several food carts that sold corn. Although the corn they used looked coarse and overcooked, i decided to try one of these grilled corn on the cob with brightly ornate sprinkles of chili powder and cheese. They were, for lack of a better word, f@cking amazing.

You do not need to travel all the way to get Elote (Spanish for corn or to grilled corn). In fact, you can make a better version at home with sweet corn from your local farmer's market.

Here's the recipe.

Ingredients:
  • 4 ears sweet corn
  • 1/4 cup mayonnaise
  • 1/2 teaspoon lime juice
  • 1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper of chile powder
  • salt, to taste
  • 2/3 cup crumbled cotija anejo cheese
  • lime wedges
  • extra cayenne pepper of chile powder, for sprinkling
  • fresh finely chopped cilantro for optional garnish
Preparation:
  1. Soak corn (in husks) in cold water for 25-30 minutes.
  2. Prepare a medium-hot grill. Peel back the corn husks leaving them attached at the end. Remove the silk. Pull the husks back up and tie with a spare piece of husk or a small piece of cooking twine. Place the ears on the grill. Cook 20-25 minutes, turning several times to ensure even roasting. The kernels should be soft when fully cooked.
  3. If you’d like the kernels more charred, then simply follow the above instructions, but cook in husks for 15 minutes only. Then cool ears slightly, pull back the husks (to use as handles) and place the ears directly on the grill (with husks overhanging the side) for 5-7 minutes, or until they reach desired level of charring.
  4. Place crumbled cheese on a plate large enough to fit an ear of corn. In a small bowl mix the mayonnaise, lime juice, cayenne pepper or chile powder, and salt. When the corn is cooked, brush each ear with some mayo sauce then roll in the cheese. Serve with lime wedges, additional cayenne pepper or chile powder, and fresh finely chopped cilantro.

** Cotija anejo, a mild-flavored Mexican cheese with a crumbly texture, can be found in Mexican markets or in the refrigerator section of most major supermarkets. Queso fresco, another mild Mexican cheese, is a good substitute and also can be found in most major supermarkets.

Note: If you are unable to grill outdoors, then you can oven roast the corn. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F and place corn in husks (no need to soak first) directly on the middle rack of the oven for 30 minutes, or until corn is soft to the touch. Allow to cool slightly, then remove husks and silks, and add toppings.
_** Cotija anejo, a mild-flavored Mexican cheese with a crumbly texture, can be found in Mexican markets or in the refrigerator section of most major supermarkets. Queso fresco, another mild Mexican cheese, is a good substitute and also can be found in most major supermarkets.

Note: If you are unable to grill outdoors, then you can oven roast the corn. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F and place corn in husks (no need to soak first) directly on the middle rack of the oven for 30 minutes, or until corn is soft to the touch. Allow to cool slightly, then remove husks and silks, and add toppings.
 
 
drinking.
cigars.
bactomavo sammy.
bare knuckle boxing.
nice cup of tea.
call it quits.
 
 
 
 
Shelf Reliance is a great website with lots of information on emergency preparedness, food rotation, survival kits and tools. One of the things i enjoy most about the page is the Emergency Kit Planner. You can enter the amount of people in your household, the conditions you are prepping for blizzard, terrorist attack...) and the kind of kit you would like (car kit, home kit...) and it gives you a list of everything you would need for that kit. Then, you can either purchase those items on the site as a package, purchase them broken down into groups or, this is my choice, print it out and buy them on my own. The prices aren't too bad, but there are cheaper alternatives.

All in all, the emergency kit generator creates a decent list and you allows for you gauge what else you might need or might have overlooked.

Check it out at http://www.shelfreliance.com/